Baby Cashmerino

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My friend Jeanne has asked me to crochet for some new babies in her family. I’ve had such a lovely time doing it because she chose Baby Cashmerino yarn which is soooo soft and a dream to crochet with. Above is a photo of the 4 items I have made: 2 ripple blankets, a boy’s hooded jacket and a girl’s cardi.

The girl’s cardigan is from Nicki Trench’s book Cute and Easy Crocheted Babies Clothes, unfortunately the pattern only goes up to 3-6 months so I tried doing it with a bigger hook and it has come out suitable for a 1 year old. I think it’s such a pretty pattern with the flowers on the front.

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The boy’s hooded jacket is from a Hayfield pattern which I’ve made a few times now. It’s hard to photo flat as the baby’s hoods are always so big. I love faux cables on crochet work, a lovely touch brightening up a baby’s jacket:

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And finally a photo of the 2 ripple blankets:

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I love rippling, I especially love rippling in Baby Cashmerino; it is so soft and every stitch you hook you can imagine a tiny soft newborn wrapped in it. Just lovely!

 

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Pass It On – Sewing In The Ends

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I recently finished the ripple blanket which I’ve been making for a while. I used Stylecraft Special DK yarn in raspberry, pale rose and grape. I’ve been hooking a lot for others lately and I just fancied a blanket I could snuggle under for myself. I was pleased it was finished and enjoyed using it for a few weeks when I noticed the ends were starting to show. Disaster! Some had even unravelled so much a hole was starting to appear 😦

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Obviously with this ripple blanket there are a lot of colour changes so there were lots of ends I had sewn it as I went along. I had been taught that knots were not professional so I had either crocheted the ends in as I made the next row, or used a tapestry needle to sew the ends under for about 4cm. This clearly was not a robust enough method to stand the test of time so I went on the internet to see what other people were doing. I found many advising to do exactly what I had been doing, so I continued to search. Then I found a few websites that suggested going under 4cm as I had done, but then turning back the other the other direction and going back under again. Hold on! Surely that will just pull out completely??? But no, you have to miss the last stitch you went under when you turn around for your way back. Right! I could see how that would hold securely, and by doing the colour change at the end of the row it will become hardly noticeable. Brilliant! I was sure this would make all the difference. So I thought I would have a go and see how it worked. I’m currently making a baby ripple blanket for my friend Jeanne (more about the gorgeous baby cashmerino yarn I’m using for this later!) I’m doing it in white this time, but I’ll add a blue stripe to try out this technique.

So this time I made sure I left a long tail – no skimping on tails for me any more!

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Firstly I crocheted both ends in for approx 4 cm on my next row as usual

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Then I threaded my ends onto a tapestry needle and turned back in the other direction, missing the first stitch.

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Finally the finished result – it definitely feels more robust than was I was doing before:

sewing in the ends final best

and I feel confident it won’t unravel over time and use. Hurrah! 🙂

This blog entry is my submission to the Deramores Blog Awards 2014. Deramores is the UK’s number one online retailer of knitting and crochet supplies.  www.deramores.com/blog-awards:

Blankets

I am currently in the middle of making 2 blankets:  a ripple one which is for me:

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and a granny square one I am making for my daughter Jude. 

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I love making blankets; they are my favourite thing. You just hook away, without any fiddly bits to think about. The ripple is the best, you can do it without thinking but its not too boring or without shape – just count to 4 every now and again. I also love that you can snuggle under the blankets while you’re making them, making hooky time comforting and productive at the same time. 

The ripple blanket I am making was originally going to be bright red, purple and fuchsia pink, but when I started with these colours it didn’t look anything like I had imagined in my head, just horribly garish; so I started again with these 3 colours. I’m using grape, pale rose and raspberry from Stylecraft DK. I love Stylecraft yarn; it is a cheap acrylic so easy on the purse strings but is as soft as the more expensive cashmerino. It may be acrylic but it’s not plastic or squeaky, perfect for blankets. I decided not to do regular ripple spacing but Interlocking ripple as described by Lucy from Attic24 here. I love the way different colours come to the fore as you look at it; sometimes it’s the raspberry which zings at you, but look away and back and it could be the pale rose you notice most. Much more interesting!

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The second blanket I’m currently making for Jude is from Nicki Trench’s book Cute and Easy Crochet. She calls it the Camellia blanket and I made a cotton version a few years ago for my eldest daughter Hannah in the colours Nicki suggests. It’s very classy. This time around I’m doing it in Stylecraft DK (of course!) using parchment for the main colour.

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What I love about this granny square blanket is that you don’t have to sew it up at the end. The squares are crocheted together using a double crochet stitch. This gives a very distinctive finish as well as being preferable to do. 

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I’m supposed to be making the granny square blanket first as Jude is asking for it, but the ripple seems to be getting there more quickly – I do enjoy hooking a ripple – sorry Jude! I’ll put Ta-Dah! photos on when they are finished.